Market Musings Blog

Local Grower: Sin Fronteras Farm

Eduardo Rivera from Sin Fronteras Farm & Food is one of the many local farmers we support because we know the work he does has a positive impact on the community. He’s passionate about building better access to fresh produce. True to the farm’s name (Sin Fronteras means “without borders”), Eduardo seamlessly bridges the cultures of Mexico and the United States.

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Growing up in Mexico, his grandfather ran a biodynamic farm. Eduardo observed that his grandfather was often criticized for trusting the environment, but it usually turned out that he was right. His grandfather clearly passed along his trust of nature to Eduardo.

He taught me to trust the plants,” he explains. “Trust the plants, be hopeful and have a positive outcome.

He has taken what he learned from his grandfather and woven it into his farming in Minnesota. His connection with the plants, nurturing them from seed to harvest, and ultimately to delivering his produce to co-ops and restaurants is a practice in hope, confidence, and trust that he embraces fully.

Yet, Eduardo, like many urban farmers, faces unique challenges. One of these is finding ample land in the Twin Cities to grow enough produce to make a living at it. Sin Fronteras Farm has two greenhouses and various plots of certified organic land spread out across the Twin Cities. That makes for a lot of travel time, which Eduardo aims to minimize. This year he is looking to break into the next level of production by getting his pepper plants into the ground earlier. He’s using high tunnels that he was able to purchase thanks to receiving a grant from the Frontera Farmer Foundation. He’d determined to grow more peppers, selling them to Twin Cities’ co-ops and restaurants, to reach his goal of buying land without going into debt. In the end, his greatest rewards are giving his daughter a little piece of what he grew up with in Mexico. That, and, growing the best peppers in the city.

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Sin Fronteras Farm mainly grows peppers—four varieties of sweet peppers, as well as hot pepper varieties like jalapeños, shishitos, habaneros, padrones, and hatch. Mississippi Market also carries his tomatillos and calabica squash, when available. We’re excited to have his peppers in our stores again this summer.

Meet Eduardo and sample his Tomatillo Pineapple Salsa!

  • Saturday, July 9, 3:00–5:00 p.m. – West 7th store
  • Sunday, July 10, 11:00 a.m.–1 p.m. – East 7th store
  • Sunday, July 10, 2:00–4:00 p.m. – Selby store

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