Market Musings Blog

Instant Pot, Instant Oats, Instant Love

By Mississippi Market Chef Partner Kristin Hamaker of Goosefoot Kitchen

Instant Pot, instant love. Well, not exactly instant love. I stared at or walked past this contraption for a full week after untangling it from its box. That was a year ago. Now, there are days when I’ve used it three times to make steel-cut oats for breakfast (3 minutes – see recipe below), chickpeas for lunch (33 minutes), and overnight chicken stock (60 minutes, but it will hold for 10 hours without flinching).

For those unaware, the Instant Pot is a multi-cooker, pressure cooker, slow cooker, rice cooker, yogurt maker, and more, all-in-one. This thing is quite a sore thumb in my kitchen since I use so few gadgets otherwise. I’m the sort to discourage anyone from buying unnecessary kitchen tools. “Use your hands”, I’m always uttering. But, I’ll confess – I couldn’t resist.

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Ask a Local Chef: Kristin Hamaker

Chef Kristin Hamaker is a longtime Mississippi Market Co-op member and founder of Goosefoot Kitchen, a weekly meal-planning service focused on healthful food, self-sufficiency, and mindful eating. In addition to being a local chef, she’s also a cooking instructor, good food advocate, and edible gardening guru. You can find her teaching meal-planning classes at the co-op and demoing simple from-scratch recipes while you shop.

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Making the Most of Citrus Season

By Mississippi Market Chef Partner Kristin Hamaker of Goosefoot Kitchen

We’re still in the heart of citrus season, and there are many delicious options to choose from. Speak with your co-op’s produce staff to learn which citrus is best at the moment and don’t hesitate to ask for a sample! Make the most of citrus season with the two fruit salad variations below – the simple citrus salad is perfect any time of day, while the elevated salad serves well as an impressive side dish for supper.

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Creamy Tofu & Herb Sauce

By Mississippi Market Chef Partner Kristin Hamaker of Goosefoot Kitchen

Makes about 1½ cups

In this recipe, the tofu gets blended with yogurt and/or sour cream. But you can be extreme if you like and use all tofu, or no tofu, and yogurt and/or sour cream.

MARKET LIST

  • ¾ cup silken tofu
  • ¾ cup drained yogurt and/or sour cream (or tofu)
  • 1 Tbsp. of extra virgin olive oil, plus extra for garnish
  • 1 garlic clove (optional)
  • Salt and pepper
  • 2 Tbsp. chopped fresh herbs (such as dill, cilantro, chives, thyme, basil, mint or parsley—singly or in combination)
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne, or paprika (optional)

A WHIRL

In a blender or food processor, whirl ¾ cup silken tofu, ¾ cup drained yogurt or sour cream, and 1 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil until smooth and creamy. Remove and put in a bowl. Add 1 minced or grated garlic clove (optional), a good pinch of kosher or sea salt, a twist of black pepper, 2 tablespoons of fresh herbs (such as dill, cilantro, chives, thyme, basil, mint or parsley—singly or in combination), and ¼ teaspoon cayenne, or paprika (optional). Stir well, taste and check for seasoning.

NOTES & VARIATIONS

  • If you adore lemon, add some fresh lemon juice and zest to this recipe.
  • This sauce could accompany anything that loves a chilled, creamy sauce, such as cooked or smoked fish, meat or poultry.

Quick & Easy Aioli

By Mississippi Market Chef Partner Kristin Hamaker of Goosefoot Kitchen

Makes ½ cup

Traditionally made aioli is wonderful and you should attempt it one of these times, but you can also easily dress up a bit of mayonnaise. Easily double or divide this recipe.

MARKET LIST

  • 1-2 fresh garlic cloves
  • Kosher or sea salt
  • Mayonnaise
  • Refer to notes and variations for additional ingredients

SO SIMPLE

Peel and mince 1-2 fresh garlic cloves on a cutting board (or you can add this to a mortar, if you have one). Sprinkle with a good pinch of kosher or sea salt and allow to sit for a few minutes. Chop or scrape the garlic and salt further with your knife (or pound, if using a pestle) until you’ve created a quick paste. Stir garlic into a ½ cup of mayonnaise.

NOTES & VARIATIONS

  • Rather than garlic, you can flavor your mayo in endless ways. Other additions include finely chopped herbs, lemon juice and zest, orange juice and zest, tomato paste or puree, saffron, chilies, Dijon or grainy mustard, horseradish, capers, even roasted red peppers.
  • Use this flavored mayo on sandwiches, or as an accompaniment to smoked or cooked poultry, meat or fish.

Goosefoot Hummus

By Mississippi Market Chef Partner Kristin Hamaker of Goosefoot Kitchen

Makes about 1 cup

We make a batch of this ubiquitous spread every single week in our house, since it is such a healthy and robust snack, and is quick and simple to conjure up. My pressure cooker gets a chickpea workout each week since I make a large batch and freeze extras in single serving containers. It takes time to cook dried beans, but it’s not your time; consider this cheap, efficient practice.

Note: if you don’t have a food processor, you can use a blender, but it may take a bit more nerve to get it to the right texture.

MARKET LIST

  • 1 cup cooked chickpeas (or 1 X 15 oz can chickpeas)
  • 1 lemon
  • 1 Tbsp. tahini
  • 1 crushed garlic clove
  • 1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • Ground cumin (optional)
  • Paprika, smoked preferably (optional)
  • Kosher or sea salt
  • Refer to notes and variations for additional ingredients

ALL TOGETHER NOW

Add 1 cup cooked chickpeas (or 1 X 15 oz can chickpeas), to the bowl of your food processor. Add the juice from 1 lemon, 1 tablespoon of tahini, 1 crushed garlic clove, 1 tablespoon of extra virgin olive oil, a pinch of ground cumin (optional), a pinch of paprika (optional), and a good pinch of kosher or sea salt.

Whizz well, and consider if you need/want more moisture to thin out your hummus. If so, you can either add some chickpea broth (from homemade chickpeas) or water, or more lemon juice if you prefer your hummus lemony. Give it another whirl in the food processor and check for flavor and consistency; consider its saltiness, spice, and texture. It may take a bit of whirling and tweaking to get it to your liking.

NOTES & VARIATIONS

  • You can vary its flavor considerably. More or less lemon or garlic, depending on how strong in either direction you like it. More or less cumin and/or paprika, depending.
  • You can substitute roasted garlic, or toasted cumin, to add more depth of flavor. Add coriander and/or ground fennel, for a bit of variation.
  • If you’re not a chickpea fan, replace the chickpeas with cooked white beans in this recipe; pull back on the moisture a bit, and add a bit of lemon zest.
  • If you would like to garnish, add minced parsley, a dusting of paprika (smoked is my favorite), a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil, a few reserved whole chickpeas, and/or some toasted pine nuts.
  • Serve with pita bread, pretzels, crackers, and/or a plate of vegetables.
  • A warm variation, as an appetizer: Double your recipe, preheat your oven to 400°F, fry 3 tablespoons of pine nuts lightly in 2 tablespoons of butter. Pour the melted butter over the dish and bake for 15-20 minutes.