Market Musings Blog

Hey, there’s a game on!

If truth be told, there are only two Super Bowls from over the years that I really remember. Read more …

Get your greens!

Hearty greens are perfect for winter meals – they pack a nutritious punch of vitamins and minerals. Dark leafy greens are known for being high in iron, calcium, magnesium, vitamin C and carotenoids, as well as many anticancer factors. If you haven’t cooked greens before, don’t be shy! They are one of the quicker, easier vegetable to prepare. Here are some of our favorite ways to get our greens.

kale webChickpeas, sausage & kale

Ingredients (serves 2)
Olive oil
1 small onion, chopped
1 large can chickpeas, rinsed and drained
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 uncooked sausages, sliced into rounds or chopped
1 bunch kale, chard or spinach (rinsed and stems removed), chopped
Beer, wine, or water
Salt & pepper to taste Read more …

Season’s Eatings

We get excited around here during the holidays. We love how the holidays bring people together and we love playing a part in people’s celebrations by providing fresh, delicious foods for their holiday spreads.


Read more …

A Vegan on Turkey Day

Have you ever been the lone vegan at a Thanksgiving celebration in Texas?  It’s not easy, let me tell you.

My Southern family includes a few types of turkeys, a ham and brisket at most Thanksgivings. Read more …

Thanksgiving Central

Cranberry_Pecan_Skillet_Stuffing_vertictal web

photo courtesy of

Digging through dozens of recipes? Reading Thanksgiving recipes until your eyes weep? We’re keeping it simple! Here’s what we think every memorable Thanksgiving meal needs: Read more …

Warm breakfast ideas

I had a realization this week. I looked down at my staple summer breakfast -a bowl of fruit, yogurt and granola- and was no longer satisfied. It just wasn’t what I wanted anymore. I wanted something heartier. I wanted something… warm.

Luckily I work here, where everyone is talking about (or eating) food, all the time. Apparently, I wasn’t the only craving something different for breakfast. As I strolled around the office, I noticed that Lauren had unpacked her Oatmeal-in-a-jar and Luke was eating a hot breakfast sandwich at his desk.

Beyond those two stand-bys around here, I was also pointed to these two recipes, both warm & hearty, yet satisfying in different ways. Read more …

Extreme Local – Wild Foraging

Before I start: wild foraging can be very dangerous. The amount of mushrooms that are fatally poisonous are relatively small, but there are a great many that will make you wish you were dead and cause serious illness. You should never eat a mushroom unless you are 100% confident in identifying it. There are a great many resources if you would like to get into wild foraging, but it should be approached with a healthy respect and only after much study. DO NOT EAT WILD MUSHROOMS ON A WHIM.

Chicken of the woods on tree

Chicken of the Woods, too old, but still pretty cool.

I am an outdoors person. I love hunting and camping, and when morel season hits in spring I am in the woods nearly every weekend. This year, I have decided to enjoy some of the local foraging that can be had in mid-summer months.

Ok, morel season is easy: little undergrowth, very distinctive mushrooms, little to no mosquitos and hardly any ticks. All of these things have made it a trendy thing to do, amateurs beating down trails to every dead elm tree in state parks around Minnesota. And with good reason, morels are delicious.

Mid-summer mushroom hunting has been about as far from that as possible. Minnesota mixed hardwood forests are hot, full of bugs, poison ivy, buckthorn, wild berries, stinging nettle, and a fair amount of other hidden pitfalls. I have found mushrooms that I have picked, learned to do a spore print, and identified them with some confidence. Only then to throw them out because doubt about my knowledge crept in (this is normal and a healthy thing). I have worn poison ivy rashes with pride for a good portion of the summer. I have invested in what I call a hippie basket, a bandaloo (which I have already lost), spent a small fortune on gas driving to state parks, and shirked some responsibilities.

Chicken gnocci with chicken of the woods

Chicken gnocci without the kale, subbing thyme in its place, and with whole wheat gnocci

Despite this, the exhilaration that I felt when I saw my first mass of orange Chicken of the Woods* was just as exciting as any morel patch I have found. Finding lobster mushrooms buried in leaves was worth the mosquito bites (technically my lovely wife found our first lobster). And wild mushroom gnocchi shared with friends and family? Good grief.

*Mississippi Market carries wild, foraged mushrooms from time to time, so it is possible to cook with them without foraging. Call ahead before making a special trip.

Here is the recipe:
Wild Mushroom Gnocchi, serves 2-3

1 med onion, diced ½ inch pieces
2 cloves garlic, minced
A large mass of wild mushroom, your choice on variety, all have been excellent – usually around .5 lbs, or you could use button, but the earthy flavor of the wild mushroom is what makes this dish. Tear/cut/break the mushroom into bite size pieces. Be sure to clean the mushroom, ideally using a brush of some kind, not in water. Mushrooms really soak up liquid and it is ok to wash them in water, but it will alter how this dish cooks and you may need to cut the rest of the water out of the recipe entirely.
2T Olive oil – you may need a little more if you are frying a large amount of mushroom, they tend to soak up liquids
1 package of Cucina Viva gnocchi
1 half of a bunch of dino kale, or a sautéing green of your choice, rough shred/julienne
1 table spoon Better Than Bouillon No Chicken Stock
1.5 cups water

1 14” sauce pan, with 1.5 inch sides, or some equivalent
1 stock pot to boil gnocchi
Salt and pepper to taste

Fry the onion, garlic, mushroom together stirring often on medium high heat until your onion just starts to become translucent. Dissolve the Better Than in 1.5 cups of water and pour that mixture into your sauce pan. Cook until reduced, but not dry. There should be some liquid left in pan to provide a ‘sauce’ for the dish.

At this time add the gnocchi to the water. The gnocchi will sink to the bottom. When it rises to the top it is done. Add your kale to your frying pan and stir it in. The gnocchi will cook quickly in a rolling boil (4-5 minutes tops) and will overcook just as fast. Scoop out the gnocchi leaving as much water as possible behind and put it right into your mushroom mix. Stir and serve.

At this time I like to shred a little Pecorino Romano on top, but that is completely optional. There are gluten free gnocchi’s in some grocery stores, so it is possible to make this dish gluten free as well.
Eat and enjoy.

Chicken of the Woods

Chicken of the Woods

James Talbot is a staff member and blogger for Mississippi Market’s Eat Local Challenge. As the grocery manager at Selby, you’ll find him in the ailes stocking the shelves, answering questions and figuring out how to make space for more awesome products. 

Locally-raised goat? Perfect for stew!

While my role at the Market is the Frozen and Bread Buyer for the Selby store, I was also raised as a meat-and-potatoes guy…and with the freezer doors right next to the meat cases, my eye always catches on sale signs and discount stickers.  This week, I saw the Shepherd’s Song ground goat meat marked down, so I thought I’d give it a try.

local goatMy project for this afternoon was to find something I could do with the goat and our large selection of CSA produce before leaving town for the weekend.  Peppers and onions were plentiful on our counter and we had almost a fridge bin full of a variety of greens, so a simple stew came to mind.

Four diced hot peppers (jalapeno and Serrano), a pair of bell peppers, three small sweet onions, and a few cloves of garlic made for an aromatic kitchen once cooked in with two packages of the goat meat, some salt, a few diced tomatoes, and a healthy dose of garam masala.  This cooked for about an hour or so on medium low heat.

My wife turned me on to sautéed greens…the preparation for I’ve come to really enjoy: fold the leaf, cut the spine off, stack a couple leaves, roll, and slice into strips.  Fill a large pot, we usually use a 2-gallon model (I’m not even joking), with the green ribbons, a bit of extra water, and a pinch of salt (sometimes I’ll add onion, garlic, or turmeric to the greens, too), and wilt it all down to al dente.  To add a third color to the meal, we halved then sliced four summer squash to salt and sauté. Enjoy!

Ben Zamora-Weiss is a staff member and blogger for Mississippi Market’s Eat Local Challenge. You’ll also find him at the Selby store keeping the shelves stocked with the best locally baked breads we can find.

Sizzlin’ Summer Sauté

One of my absolute favorite ways to cook vegetables is to sauté them. It is the simplest and fastest way to prepare vegetables and has never failed in encouraging family members to try—and like—foods they once hated.

It’s easy to start off with sautéed greens but if you really want a meal filled with summer bounty, you should try this simple summer sauté I created a couple of years ago while working on a farm.

1 medium zucchini (or 2 small)

1 medium yellow squash (or 2 small)

1 medium onion, medium dice

2 ears of corn

2 tbsp Hope Creamery butter

Salt and pepper to taste

Dice onion and cut zucchini/summer squash into quarters, and slice about 1/4” thick. Cut corn kernels off corn cob.

corn on cob

Melt butter and sauté onions until translucent on medium high heat. Add zucchini, yellow squash, and corn and sauté until vegetables caramelize – about 10-12 minutes.

Serve hot, next to freshly sliced, lightly salted tomatoes.

corn saute

Early August is the perfect time to find all of these items local and fresh at the co-op. If you crave a little meat with your veggies, grill up some of our Mississippi Market Made jalapeno cheddar brats.

A 100 percent local meal that’s 100 percent tasty!

Jess Zamora-Weiss is a staff member and blogger for Mississippi Market’s Eat Local Challenge. You’ll also find her in the Selby store’s juice bar, making things run smoothly and taste amazing!

Seriously? Orange creamsicle flavored protein powder?

Krysta runs. A lot.

Krysta runs. A lot.

I like to run. A lot. I’ve been known to run marathons and the occasional shorter distance, too, and for roughly 7-8 months of the year my boyfriend affectionately refers to my running habit as “the other man.”  His logic is pretty sound – I buy Running new shoes, I go out with Running most nights of the week, and on Sunday mornings I have a standing date with Running for 2-3 hours, not to mention how sweaty I am when I return home.

So you see, I am a runner, and contrary to popular belief, being a good runner or athlete depends on fueling just as much as training. I try my hardest to eat pretty well (and to be honest it isn’t too difficult when working at a natural foods co-op) but trying to find clean “sport” products proves to be another challenge entirely. You know what I’m talking about – the electrolyte drinks with high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), the protein powders with flavors like “orange creamsicle” and “cookies and cream,” and those energy gels made out of….whatever they are made out of!  All of these things seem counterintuitive to feed my body, and so when I found out that the co-op, MY co-op, was going to bring in a few “sport lines,” I literally leapt for joy.

Part of Krysta's running shoe collection.

Part of Krysta’s running shoe collection.

Below is a short list of my favorite “sport” products  – give them a try, especially if your sport-of-choice has developed into an imaginary friend who takes up all of your free time. Because in that case your imaginary friend deserves something new and awesome like a HFCS-free electrolyte drink!

Vega Sport Endurance Gel – just like all of those other weird gels on the market, but better! These sticky space-food-looking packets are awesome during long runs (runs lasting more than 90 minutes) and are made with dates and coconut oil!

Tera’s Whey Organic Whey Protein – A local, organic, DELICIOUS protein powder in real flavors and colors (I’m looking at you Big Brand orange creamsicle flavor!) I love to add a few scoops to my post-run smoothie to refuel; the Fair Trade Dark Chocolate is so good it tastes sinful.

Trace Minerals Electrolyte Stamina Power Paks – these little packets are the bees knees, small and simple, and not so different from your favorite vitamin-C supplement. Trace Minerals knows their stuff, and so they understand that athletes need electrolytes as well as potassium, vitamin C, and a few carbs and calories for good measure. Perfect for a sweaty summer run!

Zico Coconut Water – I admit it, I was slow to catch onto the coconut water craze. The thickness of its consistency really turned me off, but the benefits that it touted were hard to ignore, so I bought a few and gave them a try. Coconut water is seriously awesome stuff, made from pure water harvested from coconuts and loaded with electrolytes, potassium, and refreshing coconut flavor.